IBC 2012: Accurately warping desktop content

Release from Wed., August 29, 2012

At IBC 2012 (Hall 8, Booth B80), Fraunhofer FOKUS will present its new method for desktop warping of content onto irregularly shaped surfaces. With this technology, desktop content from any computer program can be directly adapted to and projected onto geometrically complex, curved screens. The calculations necessary to adjust luminosity and geometry take place on the graphics board, which allows for a display without time delay and renders capture cards or warping boxes unnecessary.

At IBC 2012 (Hall 8, Booth B80), Fraunhofer FOKUS will present its new method for desktop warping of content onto irregularly shaped surfaces. With this technology, desktop content from any computer program can be directly adapted to and projected onto geometrically complex, curved screens. The calculations necessary to adjust luminosity and geometry take place on the graphics board, which allows for a display without time delay and renders capture cards or warping boxes unnecessary.

Flight simulators, control rooms, multimedia installations: they all often require a complex setup consisting of several clustered projectors that project media content onto curved surfaces. The resulting display is to fill the entirety of the surface without overlaps of the individual projector images and should offer a natural visual experience for the viewer. In the context of the FOKUS media player, Fraunhofer FOKUS has developed automatic calibration software, which enables such calibration for specific media content. Thus, video content is automatically adjusted to the projection surface on the PC. The software calculates the necessary rectification of geometry (warping) and adjustment of luminosity (blending). The media player is suited only for specific content, such as movies, pictures, text and individual 3D objects. In some cases, however, other types of desktop content, like computer games or simulations, are to be displayed on the projection surface. Previously, when wanting to display such content, a so-called warping box or a capture card, which was integrated in an additional computer, had to be interposed between the graphics board and the projector. Warping and blending then took place on the warping box or capture card. However, the additionally interposed hardware created a delay in the content display. This is problematic especially for simulators and computer games: Here a response to user input should be generated as quickly as possible, so that a natural interaction is guaranteed while the user is operating the program. Fraunhofer FOKUS‘ newly developed method for desktop warping offers a solution to this issue. With this technology, necessary adjustments of content to irregular screen surfaces take place directly on the driver unit of the high-capacity graphics board. The driver warps the desktop, so that it appears as a uniform image on the projection surface. Because no intermediate step is needed in this setup, the output of the content is faster and takes place without delay.

FOKUS’ desktop warping technology thus constitutes a considerable improvement compared to previous solutions. The software can be utilized for simulators, e.g. product simulations, for gaming, multimedia installations in the areas of advertising, entertainment, events, on stage, and in control rooms.

At the IBC in Amsterdam, FOKUS researchers will present their desktop warping method with 3D projections on a waved surface.

Visit us from September 7th to 11th at the IBC in hall 8,
booth B80. If you wish, you can arrange an appointment with us in advance.